Elisa Long

Associate Professor of Decisions, Operations, and Technology Management

About

Elisa Long’s research integrates epidemiological modeling, economic analysis and decision making under uncertainty, with the aim of assessing the value of health interventions to help policymakers allocate limited resources most effectively. Among Long’s newest interests is improving patient health literacy. She is studying why some patients might overestimate their risks in the face of serious disease and how they can become more literate around their treatment options.

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7 Articles

View of a hurricane from space Research Brief / Behavioral Economics

Amid Unfounded ‘Hurricane Skepticism,’ Trump Voters Were Less Likely to Evacuate

Only after a Rush Limbaugh broadcast did evacuation rates diverge politically

Nurses washing their hands outdoors while wearing face masks Research Brief / COVID-19

Employees Work at Multiple Nursing Homes and Spread COVID-19

Smartphone GPS tracks staffers between facilities

Empty Times Square in New York in blue (left side); "Quarantine Overkill" sign held by a woman at a rally in red (right) Research Brief / COVID-19

How Clinton and Trump Voters Behave in — and Spread — a Pandemic

Estimates are based on smartphone data and precinct-level 2016 vote results

Person in an ICU Research Brief / Health Care

Research: Patients Spent 15 Hours Longer than Necessary in the ICU

Delaying transfers to other inpatient hospital rooms limits availability of costly beds

FDA building Feature / Health Care

A Tool to Make FDA Drug Approval Practices Transparent

Researchers aim to help the agency, drug companies and patients better understand the complex authorization process

Ebola tent Research Brief / Health Care

When Ebola Strikes, Where Should Help Go?

Improving epidemic forecasting helps response teams target aid more effectively

Computer model of chromosomes unwinding Feature / Health Care

BRCA Mutation: New Model Quantifies How Surgeries Reduce Cancer Risk

Informed by personal experience, a researcher parses data to help those mulling mastectomy and gynecological surgeries