Valentin Haddad

Associate Professor of Finance

About

Valentin Haddad’s research interests lie in asset pricing and macroeconomics with financial frictions. He has looked at how financial institutions trade and manage risk, and how their practices affect market prices and the economy — and found that a lot of what we thought was obvious is not. His recent studies show that life insurance companies’ investments in Treasuries, contrary to traditional assumptions, are actually quite risky.

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6 Articles

Graphic of investor leisurely sitting in front of an investment terminal reading a book Research Brief / Investing

As Passive Investing Spreads, Overall Market Becomes Less Competitive

Active investors take up some — but not all — of the slack created by index funds

Lehman Brothers building on September 15 Research Brief / Investing

When Financial Intermediaries Sneeze, These Assets Catch a Cold

Some investment vehicles are more reliant than others on the health of trading firms

A bubble refracts light and the image of a window Research Brief / Markets

Market Bubbles Aren’t Entirely Irrational Exuberance

A model examines the relationships between innovation, speculation and market values

Bar and line chart Research Brief / Corporate Finance

What Drives LBO Fever? More Than Just Cheap Loans

Private equity investors weigh the total cost of capital — not just debt, but equity as well — when pursuing buyouts

Illustration of a character wearing a hat covering their ears Research Brief / Investing

Ignorance — About One’s Investments, Anyway — Isn’t Always Bliss

Valentin Haddad’s research looks at the phenomenon of “information aversion,” when individual investors stop tracking their portfolios for fear of bad news

New York Met Life building Research Brief / Investing

How Life Insurers Insulate the Markets from Turmoil

Valentin Haddad’s research finds that insurers’ patient investing shields risky assets — and those who hold them — from steeper declines