Franklin Shaddy

Assistant Professor of Marketing and Behavioral Decision Making

About

Franklin Shaddy is interested in understanding how consumers form judgments and make decisions in the marketplace. His current research examines goals and motivation, the psychology of bundling, perceptions of fairness, and the causes and consequences of consumer impatience. His findings suggest that because time is distributed equally, people tend to favor first-come, first-served policies that require them to spend time rather than money.

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6 Articles

Two hands holding a phone displaying a man on a video call Research Brief / Behavioral Economics

Good News or Bad, We Like to Experience It With a Friend

Less so when it’s really bad news

Strawberry doughnut with sprinkles Research Brief / Behavioral Decision Making

When a Mistake Isn’t

Decision making research may sometimes rush to judgment

Chocolate truffles in a display case Research Brief / Consumer Behavior

How Much We Value Something Increases Our Patience

Delayed gratification isn’t just about willpower

Sale signs at a mall with people walking Feature / Behavioral Decision Making

Sales Promotions Influence People Beyond Purchasing Decisions

Exposure to discounts makes people impatient

Person shopping online on a laptop Research Brief / Marketing

Free Shipping: Our Preference to Spend on Ultimate Goals vs. Preliminary Steps

Prerequisites are valued poorly in a series of six experiments

People in line to buy tickets at a booth Feature / Pricing

Fairness in the Allocation of Scarce Goods and Services

As alternative pricing schemes proliferate, researchers examine beliefs about their fairness