Ricardo Perez-Truglia

Associate Professor of Economics

About

Ricardo Perez-Truglia’s research interests include behavioral economics, political economy and public economics. He studies how social interactions and information frictions shape economic and political decisions and intends his research to inform policymakers in the developed and developing world, leading to practical applications.

Topics
Photo of Ricardo  Perez-Truglia

15 Articles

Banner for Some Homeowners Put Off Sale When Told of Likely Rise in Market Feature / Economics

Some Homeowners Put Off Sale When Told of Likely Rise in Market

Investors who don’t occupy a home are likelier to delay for top dollar

Tom Wolf political lawn sign Research Brief / Behavioral Economics

Political and Charitable Giving: One Rises, the Other Falls

In an election year, that’s bad news for organizations like the American Red Cross

Coworkers at a bar talking Research Brief / Gender Gap

All Along the Pipeline, Men Promote Men

At one bank, the cumulative effect of male bonding accounts for 39% of the gender pay gap

A man with a headlamp and safety helmet on Research Brief / Wealth Inequality

Americans Want to Help Poor People, but Only the Hard-Working Poor

Biases around race, nation-of-origin and disability are small compared to the preference for helping the diligent

Illustration of a head with blinders Feature / Behavioral Decision Making

How People Gather Information — or Don’t — to Make Decisions

Personal beliefs, especially among the less educated, often outweigh actual data

Illustration of office buildings with a silhouette of a figure holding their arms out Research Brief / Taxes

Businesses Vastly Overestimate the Likelihood of Being Audited

Should tax-collecting agencies keep audit activity secret to discourage cheating?

Illustration of people surrounding a magnifying glass with varying dollar amounts above their heads Feature / Compensation

Pay Transparency: Will It Help or Hurt Workers?

Many assume salary transparency will benefit employees, but research suggests downsides, too

Illustration of a brain and a hand holding up a coin Research Brief / Behavioral Economics

Do People Donate Money to Signal Their Intelligence?

Research suggests such a connection when donations are publicized

Illustration of eyes looking at a computer screen Research Brief / Taxes

Shaming of Tax Delinquents Works

34,334 letters were sent to test how sensitive those owing back taxes are to neighbors’ knowledge of the debts

Monochrome image of a church facade Research Brief / Ethics

In a Global Church, Even a Widely Publicized Scandal’s Impact is Decidedly Local

Revisiting research on Catholic clergy sex abuse: Pennsylvania can expect fewer churchgoers and a painful decline in charitable contributions

Illustration of characters with thought bubbles containing dollar signs Research Brief / Compensation

It’s OK if the Boss Earns More, but a Problem When Co-Workers Do

Study of a large corporation explores how salary comparisons affect employee behavior

Guillermo Moreno Research Brief / Economics

Citizens Are Not Fooled by Fake Statistics

What happened when the Argentine government lied about inflation numbers?

Illustration of hands raised in blue, with one hand colored red Feature / Politics

Campaign Contributions Swayed by Neighbors’ Politics

A field experiment using public donation data indicates peer pressure matters

Illustration of buildings Research Brief / Behavioral Economics

$54,000 a Year: It Feels Like More If Your Neighbors Make Less

Ricardo Perez-Truglia’s research uses relocation choices of medical residents to study feelings about relative income

Inverted image of a calculator Research Brief / Taxes

Boo! Does Merely Mentioning an Audit Increase Taxpayer Compliance?

Research undermines the notion that companies coldly calculate tax avoidance